India out. GST war on islam. Islamist leader Abdelilah Benkirane as Morocco Premier (write to: abdulruff_jnu@yahoo.com)

India out.

GST war on islam.

Islamist leader Abdelilah Benkirane as Morocco Premier

-DR. ABDUL RUFF

abdulruff_jnu@yahoo.com

_________

Parliament in Rabat, Morocco, 20 November 2011

I – Poll

Moroccans have elected new lower house of parliament on 25 November, in the first national vote since the approval of constitutional reforms in July billed as laying the foundations for a fully-fledged constitutional monarchy. Moderate Islamists, as expected, did well the vote after a similar success in Tunisia’s first democratic election a month ago and the Justice and Development Party (PJD) emerged as the biggest party in Friday’s parliamentary elections.

The Justice and Development Party (PJD) took 107 seats out of the 395 in Parliament, almost twice as many as the second-place nationalist Istiqlal party, with 60 seats. The election was held more than a year early, after pro-democracy demonstrations swept the country earlier this year as part of the regionwide Arab Spring.

The leader of a moderate Islamist party Abdelilah Benkirane has been appointed by King Mohammed VI as Morocco’s new prime minister. Abdelilah will now hold talks on forming a coalition government.  His Justice and Development Party has not been in government before.

The PJD’s victory follows that of Tunisia’s Islamist Ennahda Party in an election there last month. Following elections, King Mohammed VI is for the first time obliged to choose the prime minister from the largest party, rather than naming whoever he pleases. King Mohammed received Benkirane, who is the PJD’s secretary general, in the mountain town of Midelt and named him head of government with the task of forming a new government.

Under a new constitution approved by referendum in July, the king has to choose a prime minister from the party that won the most seats. The constitution also gives the prime minister more powers to govern, but the king still has the final say on issues of defence, security and religion. The reforms were supported by all the main political parties, which called on their supporters to back the proposals in the referendum.

The 20 February movement, which spearheaded Morocco’s pro-democracy protests earlier this year, has called for a boycott of the elections, dismissing them as a “piece of theatre”. It says the constitutional changes approved in July are superficial, and perpetuate a “facade of democracy” that – it says – has disguised continuing royal rule for decades.

King Mohammed VI presented the constitutional changes as a far-reaching concession to Arab Spring-style pro-democracy protests, but activists believe they will do little to change the actual power structure and have called for a boycott of the elections. As a result of the constitutional changes approved by 98% of those voting in a 1 July referendum, the position of the prime minister, who must now be appointed from the largest party in parliament, has also been enhanced, gaining the authority to appoint government officials and dissolve parliament.  However, the parliament will have a greater share of power and – in theory – will play the leading role in a legislative process previously dominated by the king.

Benkirane, who was elected head of his party in 2008, leads its more pro-monarchy faction. He has repeatedly stated his support for a strong king, even though some of his colleagues would prefer a less powerful ruler. “The head of the state is king and no-one can govern without him,” he told supporters. The PJD has said it will promote Islamic finance. However, it has avoided focusing on issues such as alcohol and headscarves for women.

Many of the protesters who took to the streets in February feel the reforms still fall far short of their demands for a democratic, constitutional monarchy, and have called for a boycott. Ahead of the poll, the sleepy calm of the capital, Rabat, was occasionally punctuated by the marches of unemployed graduates. But the country’s powerful monarchy and the system that supports it appear to have averted any direct, mortal challenge for now.

A low turnout in the parliamentary poll would detract from the legitimacy of King Mohammed VI’s reforms and could hint at future problems.

II – Morocco

The Kingdom of Morocco is the most westerly of the North African countries known as the Maghreb. To the south, the status of Western Sahara remains unresolved. Morocco annexed the territory in 1975 and a guerrilla war with Algerian-backed pro-independence forces ended in 1991. UN efforts have failed to break the political deadlock. To the north, a dispute with Spain in 2002 over the tiny island of Perejil revived the issue of the sovereignty of Melilla and Ceuta. The small enclaves on the Mediterranean coast are surrounded by Morocco and have been administered by Madrid for centuries.

Strategically situated with both Atlantic and Mediterranean coastlines, but with a rugged mountainous interior, it stayed independent for centuries while developing a rich culture blended from Arab, Berber, European and African influences.  However, Morocco was a French protectorate from 1912 to 1956, when Sultan Mohammed became king. He was succeeded in 1961 by his son, Hassan II, who ruled for 38 years. He played a prominent role in the search for peace in the Middle East, given the large number of Israelis of Moroccan origin, but was criticized for suppressing domestic opposition. A truth commission set up to investigate human rights violations during Hassan’s reign confirmed nearly 10,000 cases, ranging from death in detention to forced exile. After his death in 1999 Hassan was succeeded by his son, who became King Mohammed VI and was seen as a modernizer. There has been some economic and social liberalization, but the monarch has retained sweeping powers.

King Mohammed is aided by a powerful propaganda machine – his image adorns streets and shops across the country. Central to the monarchical regime’s strength is its longevity – the Alaoui dynasty gained control of most of Morocco in 1664 – and its claim of descent from the Prophet Muhammad. The king has tremendous religious and political capital – it’s not just the king but the whole political establishment, the monarchy and the “makhzen” provide for the patronage network that embodies Morocco’s ruling elite.

Moroccan citizens, many of them poor and illiterate and living in rural areas, are made to believe that the monarch has a special gift or blessing and they feel that they have some psychological relationship with the king. Symbolic rituals also boost his status. In an annual ceremony of allegiance, the “bay’a”, Moroccan officials bow before the king as he parades on a horse.

Despite these traditional trappings, the monarchy under the 48-year-old king has taken on a more modern, reformist image. His father, Hassan II, ran a notoriously brutal regime between 1961 and 1999. Opponents were tortured and protests repressed.  1965, the interior minister at the time, Gen Mohammed Oufkir, supervised a crackdown on demonstrations in Casablanca from a helicopter while – according to one story – personally spraying rioters with a machine gun. But a process of gradual reform began in the final years of Hassan’s rule, and continued with his son. It included a family law that advanced women’s rights and a truth commission that explored abuses under King Hassan – though none of those responsible were prosecuted.

Along with Ennahda in Tunisia and the Justice and Development Party (AKP) in Turkey, it places itself within a contemporary movement to promote and respect Islam and reconcile Islam and democracy. Coalitions of more secular, royalist parties have tried to smother it and the Islamists have found it hard to directly challenge the king because of his religious status as “commander of the faithful”. It too is seen by many as being in the pocket of the palace. The PJD here in Morocco is presenting the ‘third way’ between revolution and the uncertainty of the current system.

The toppling of long-standing leaders in Tunisia and Egypt at the beginning of the year is widely seen as having caught the Moroccan regime off-guard, at a time when the reform process had stagnated. As Morocco’s own protest movement took shape, a long-held taboo was breached. It’s the first time in Morocco that the king was openly criticized and they didn’t shoot people. Instead, the monarchy’s response was to promise changes including rights guarantees and more powers for the parliament. These were enshrined in a new constitution that was approved by referendum in July.

III – Observations

Maybe, the Arab World is in the process of changing but Arabs still don’t know the results and what will happen in Egypt, Tunisia, Syria or Yemen especially the destruction of Libya by the NATO-UNSC terror organizations. The moderately Islamist Justice and Development Party (PJD), which has been buoyed by the recent reforms, and by the gains Islamists have made elsewhere in the region, could win the election and so supply the next prime minister.

Leaders of Morocco claim they are presenting the way of reform without losing the stability, the unity of the country- but at the same time furthering the democratic agenda of Morocco.

Morocco’s ruling elite thinks it has skillfully sidestepped the revolutionary fervor sweeping the Arab world by offering a milder, more peaceful vision of change. Critics of the reforms point in particular to the fact that the king will still have wide-ranging executive powers, in particular control over foreign, defence and security policy. Activists also say the reforms will not end the behind-the-scenes dominance of the “makhzen” – a power apparatus of veteran politicians, powerful businesspeople, the security forces and royal officials controlled by the king through a system of patronage.

Morocco is bidding for membership of the European Union, its main trade partner, but there appears to be little enthusiasm for this within the bloc.

Morocco has been given the status of non-Nato ally by Washington, which has praised its support for the US-led war on terror. After deadly suicide bombings in Casablanca in 2003, Morocco launched a crackdown on suspected Islamic militants.

The message of a democratic agenda and gradual change is one that has gone down well with Morocco’s allies in the anti-Islamic US and Europe who promote pro-west leaders in Muslim world and destabilize the Muslim nations if the leaders do not buy CIA terror gimmicks…

Political and poll bribery is common. Sheep were being handed out to voters, and over the last few months, the protest movement has been subject to a smear campaign, arrests, and intimidation at the hands of shadowy groups of pro-monarchy thugs known as “baltaja”. But Moroccans say they will show the Western world that Morocco can bring about a gentle revolution and the nation can travel towards a real democracy.

In Morocco elections are never decisive as the king retains ultimate control and though parliament has more power, parties are weak. The electoral system is prepared on purpose not to let anyone succeed, so it’s impossible to get more than 20% of the seats in parliament and this is to allow the monarchy to dominate. The manipulation of the party system is just one of the old-fashioned tactics still being deployed to bolster the status quo.  According to analysts, the reforms passed this year are largely cosmetic, and there is no guarantee they will be put into practice on the ground. However, so long as it plays the NATO fiddle well, it has got nothing to worry.

Claims, fake or real, of descent from the Prophet Muhammad (Peace) by a few pampered Muslim leaders might be fashionable but are ridiculous if they decline to promote true Islam in the society. Moroccan king clams the same of being a descent from the Prophet Muhammad but he shamelessly sides with NATO terrorism and western anti-Islamism. A Muslim nation that promotes anti-Islamism and helps, directly or otherwise, the anti-Islamic GST rogues and refuses to promote Islamic way of life and institutionalize Islamic law on daily basis ceases to be a Muslim nation.  Muslim leaders in such societies are guilty of anti-Islamic crimes.

Elected premier Islamist leader Abdelilah Benkirane, though worships the king, has a responsibly constructive role to play in this regard so that Islam takes firm roots in the society. Americans, Britishers and other western terrocrats cannot help him or Morocco in this regard. Benkirane’s pro-people policies and their proper implementation would greatly benefit not just Muslims but entire humanity in some measure.

Muhammad praying at the Ka’ba.

——–
د. عبد راف

Dr. Abdul Ruff, Specialist on State Terrorism; Educationalist;Chancellor-Founder of Centor for International Affairs(CIA); Independent Analyst;Chronicler of Foreign occupations & Freedom movements(Palestine,Kashmir, Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Xinjiang, Chechnya, etc); Anti-Muslimism and anti-Islamism are more dangerous than “terrorism” Anti-Islamic forces & terrorists are using criminal elements for terrorizing the world and they in disguise are harming genuine interests of ordinary Muslims. Global media today, even in Muslim nations, are controlled by CIA  & other anti-Islamic agencies. Former university Teacher;/website:abdulruff.wordpress.com

AAP’s national hopes amid personality clash!

AAP’s national hopes amid personality clash!

-Dr. Abdul Ruff

___________________

Delhiites are confused once again with the unnecessary squabbles in AAP. They  had  very enthusiastically voted for  AAP, expected more unity and  cohesion in  the party after  the first ever massive mandate they gave to AAP  but they, like naughty boys quarrel  for selfish reasons as they are engaged in a self-image building  battle forgetting that  people  of Delhi  have not given them their valuable votes.

Kejriwal should now realize that god has not given him votes but the people of Delhi have chosen him and his party to rule, totally rejecting the faces in their traditional parties like BJP and Congress, for promoting AAP inner squabbles.

If the leaders of AAP really care for the significance of Delhi voters they would not have resorted to anti-voter squabbles.

It is indeed disrespect to Delhiites who stood long queues to make AAP leaders the ruling elite of Delhi state to government properly but they behave like small scale business guys..

Accusations against party leadership and removals of the accused by the party followed in the party causing strains in the rank and file of the party which is committed to the cause of common people.

Kejriwal’s climb-down from the high horse he had mounted at the Ramlila Maidan, when he publicly rebuked those advocating the party’s expansion, is not insignificant. Headstrong, impatient politicians like Kejriwal generally do not reverse decisions they announce publicly unless a volte-face becomes inevitable. The alacrity with which Kejriwal has swallowed his pride and words shows the pressure from the grassroot workers must have been immense and irresistible.

This is a rare instance of internal democracy performing a bloodless coup against an evolving dictatorship. Kejriwal’s unilateral decision to focus on Delhi was flawed from the very beginning. By vetoing future electoral battles, Kejriwal had ignored the cardinal rule of political warfare: you do not put together an army of volunteers and workers only to disband or send it back to the barracks.

A month after assuming power in the national capital, the Aam Aadmi Party (AAP) announced that it has decided to go national. Confirming the development, AAP leader Sanjay Singh told the media that the Political Affairs Committee (PAC) has decided to expand the party in other states, an issue over which senior leader Yogendra Yadav had earlier come under fire as he had favoured AAP spreading its wings in other states, but Kejriwal objected to the idea.

The decision was taken at a meeting of the PAC, the party’s top decision-making body, held at Delhi Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal’s Kaushambi residence. Five of the PAC’s seven members met at the residence of Kejriwal, who returned to the capital late on Monday after 12 days of naturopathy treatment in Bengaluru for his nagging cough and high blood sugar. (The 46-year-old Aam Aadmi Party leader was admitted on March 5 to the hospital on the city’s outskirts for treating his chronic cough and high blood sugar as he is a diabetic).

The Delhi CM also said that he was feeling fit and fresh and was excited to return to the national capital to resume his work.  Battling infighting, the AAP decided to take steps to douse the flames of dissent by reaching out to senior leaders Yogendra Yadav and Prashant Bhushan besides expanding the party in other states, one of the contentious issues behind the rift.

Those who took part in the meeting included Kejriwal, his deputy Manish Sisodia. Over the past few weeks, AAP has been embroiled in internal turmoil with leaders from both the camps making accusations and levelling allegations against each other.

AAP leaders hoped and maintained that the crisis in the party would soon end, and party leaders would reach out to Prashant Bhushan, who, along with Yogendra Yadav, was ousted from the PAC this month. The efforts for rapprochement by both the sides picked momentum following Kejriwal’s return.  Sanjay Singh, Kumar Vishwas, Ashutosh and Ashish Khetan — all known to be Kejriwal loyalists — met Yadav and held discussions on several contentious issues. Both the camps termed the discussions as “positive”.

Kejriwal and Yadav also briefly interacted at a city court with Yadav and Bhushan who had extended an olive branch to Kejriwal by seeking a meeting with him and the AAP chief responded by saying that he will meet them “soon”. However, Bhushan wanted to meet only Kejriwal to sort out their differences. Kejriwal declined.  Bhushan added that Kejriwal told him he was busy until the Budget session and will meet him thereafter.

However, in the party’s last National Executive on March 4, Yadav and Bhushan were voted out from the PAC over accusations of working against the party and trying to malign Kejriwal’s image.

At a meeting of the truncated political affairs committee of the party on March 16, Kejriwal and his coterie decided to contest elections “wherever the organisation is strong.” If the earlier resolve was rooted in ahankar, the decision to go national with a divided house is a sign that bloated egos in the AAP have been deflated. The oligarchy in the AAP has realized that volunteers also have a voice in decision- making; ignoring them would have been suicidal for both Kejriwal and his party.

During the Delhi election, volunteers from across India—and from many other countries—had participated in the campaign with the hope that this was the beginning of the war against established political parties and prevailing systems that work against the common people and promote the rich and corporate lords.

Democracy should mean a lot to common people in AAP. Kejriwal had, in fact, ignored the basic principle of Indian politics: a party can’t survive unless it agrees to share the benefits of power right down to the grass root level. To ensure loyalty and participation, parties have to devolve power and delegate responsibilities; they have to be built right from the bottom. But Kejriwal was trying to create a crony-heavy pyramid without a base.

One of the reasons why Yogendra Yadav and Prashant Bhushan were able to muster the support of a large number of party volunteers and state units (like Rajasthan, where the office-bearers had passed a resolution supporting them) was that they were seen advocating expansion and autonomy to state units. In Maharashtra, Karnataka and Punjab too, many local leaders were keen that the party consider Yadav’s argument.

In the parliamentary poll 2014, only Punjab could send four MPs to Indian parliament as the only MPs to represent AAP while Delhi had totally rejected the childish AAP leadership.  Kejriwal is not  happy about that. Volunteers and leaders in these units, who had bravely battled on for the party with the hope that their state’s turn would be next, were dismayed when Kejriwal did not even bother to seek their opinion. For a party founded on the principle of ‘Swaraj’, a leader who had sought the opinion of voters (even if it was a farce) before forming the government in Delhi in 2013, the decision taken behind closed doors was an unmitigated disaster.

In the end, Kejriwal has taken the right decision, but only after an acrimonious war with dissenters like Yadav and threats of rebellion from the state units.

It’s very difficult to fall apart and both sides now seem to be thinking on saving the ship. The collective will of the people should be honored and both Kejriwal and Bhushan-Yadav duo should arrive at a mutual understanding for the long-term benefit of the party, as AAP ignited hopes amongst millions.” The general will seems to be prevailing as the three – Kejriwal, Yadav and Bhushan – made a joint appearance in Karkardooma court in a defamation case where they refrained from making any public comment on each other.

Soon after waging a war among themselves, the factions within the Aam Aadmi Party have hit the reconciliation button following Arvind Kejriwal’s return from Bangalore. He has already held two separate meetings with the leaders of the two factions besides directing both not to go public with intra-party matters. While some in the party question why he let the matter fester, some believe it has worked well for him as a tactical move. His authority over the party is fully established now. He can play peacemaker with ease.

It’s the Prashant Bhushan-Yogendra Yadav camp which began the reconciliation bid when on Monday Bhushan sent a text message to Kejriwal stating that he wanted to meet him to discuss the latest developments. In the evening Kumar Vishwas, Sanjay Singh, Ashutosh and Ashish Khetan, leaders of the other faction, met Yogendra Yadav. This was the first such meeting after Bhushan and Yadav’s ouster from the party’s powerful political affairs committee. According to party sources, on Tuesday afternoon, leaders of both groups met again at Khetan’s residence.

True, apart from Kejriwal none of the party leaders makes any real difference to the party’s upward or downward swings. If party leaders show disrespect to party supremo it sends out wrong signals to the nation but that would not benefit the problem-shooters in any way, however.

People of Delhi expect their leader Kejriwal to listen to what they have to say before making policy or political decisions. After all, AAP belongs to Delhiites and Kejriwal and team only serve them.

CM Kejriwal may be happy now that AAP is purged of “dissidents” but this is only the beginning of the story for Kejriwal. More dissidents, unlike Bhushan and Yadav, even without any significant contribution to the party’s development may raise their voices against Kejriwal’s unilateral mindset, if he does not change it now..

Meanwhile, Delhiites may have a plan B as well. After all, it is their lives and prestige that are involved in the infighting of the AAP.

One hope some sense shall prevail in the party head quarters.

Indian religious politics: Jayalalithaa now invokes divine intervention in settling the illegal assets case!

Indian religious politics: Jayalalithaa now invokes divine intervention in settling the illegal assets case!.

Flood panic in Kashmir, Centre sends rescue forces!

Flood panic in Kashmir, Centre sends rescue forces!

-Dr. Abdul Ruff Colachal

________________

Jammu Kashmir is again in the grip of flood panic on March 30 as several areas of the Kashmir Valley and parts of Jammu were in deluge caused by rains due to which four people have died and fate of at least 13 others was unknown.

Kashmir valley was a witness to unprecedented devastating floods only seven months ago, but Kashmiris face the same ill-fate again now.  As authorities declared a flood situation in Kashmir, the Centre and the state government swung into action, with eight teams of National Disaster Response Force (NDRF) being rushed to the Valley to help in rescue and relief.

The heavy downpour has caused fresh landslides along the 294-km Srinagar-Jammu National Highway as the only all weather road link between Kashmir and rest of the country remained closed for the third straight day today. Authorities have also issued an avalanche warning for seven districts of Kashmir division and advised people not to move around.

Over 280 people had been killed and tens of thousands left homeless and property worth hundreds of crores of rupees damaged in unprecedented floods in the state in September last year. Refusing to take any chances this time, people started shifting to safer places. Civil administration and police also asked people living along the banks of River Jhelum to move to safer places.

The Centre assured all help to the state government and Prime Minister Narendra Modi rushed is trusted minister Mukhtar Abbas Naqvi, the only Muslim face of BJP in the government to the Valley for on-the-spot assessment and coordinate with state authorities with regard to the assistance required. Before leaving for the Valley, Naqvi said Prime Minister Narendra Modi “is also worried about the situation and he is ready and committed to help the people”. “The Centre is committed to provide all help required by the state,” he said. He said there was no need for panic as “our governments, both in the state and at the Centre, are committed to do everything. We will not be found lagging in anything.”

JK Chief Minister Mufti Sayeed told Assembly in Jammu after visiting affected areas of Srinagar that the central government led by PM Narendra Modi has granted Rs 200 crore as immediate relief and the state government has sanctioned Rs 35 crore — Rs 25 crore for Kashmir and Rs 10 crore for Jammu region which also has been affected by flood.  CM Sayeed said one person died and 10 others are trapped in the debris of a house which collapsed in Laldan area of Budgam district of Kashmir valley due to floods. “We hope and pray that all of them survive. As of now we are not in a position to confirm either way,” he said.

Due to heavy rains over the past 36 hours, river Jhelum was flowing above the danger mark at several places including Sangam in Anantnag district and Ram Munshi Bagh in the city. Flood water entered several low-lying areas of Kashmir, including capital Srinagar, leading to panic among the locals for whom memories of the devastating deluge only seven months back are fresh in mind. Police later said that three women have died while at least 13 other people are believed to be trapped in the debris after a landslide brought down four houses in Budgam.

Schools have been shut down for the next four days and board examinations postponed for two days. Three control rooms have been set up with Chief Minister Mufti Mohammad Sayeed along with a team of Ministers monitoring the whole situation in the Valley and supervising the administrative response to safeguard life and property of people.

Sayeed said there was an “unfortunate” death in Udhampur and there have been some flash floods in Jammu as well. “We are watching the situation,” he said.

Rainfall stopped in the city this morning and slowed down in south Kashmir. However, according to Met department heavy rainfall is likely to occur at isolated places in the state over the next few days. Temporary camps have been set up in various government buildings for people who have been forced to leave their homes. Nearly 250 families were evacuated to safer areas from across the flood prone areas of the valley yesterday while over 40 structures were damaged due to landslides on Friday in Chrar-e-Sharief area of Budgam district.

The NDRF teams have been airlifted along with all equipment like communication, rescue and retrieval gadgets as per the standard operating procedures.

Union Home Minister Rajnath Singh today spoke to Jammu and Kashmir Chief Minister Mufti Mohammad Sayeed and conveyed to him that relief materials are being air dashed to the flood-affected valley in the shortest possible time. During the telephonic talk, the Chief Minister briefed the Home Minister about the prevailing flood situation in Kashmir valley and the steps being taken for rescue and providing relief to the affected people. Singh assured full central assistance to tackle the flood situation and conveyed to Mufti that relief materials are being airlifted to the valley in shortest possible time to help the state government in rescue and relief operations.

Former Chief Minister Omar Abdullah voiced hope that authorities will take adequate steps to help the people. “We don’t want to play politics on the situation. It has been only seven months and once again the people are face to face with another tragedy,” he told reporters.

The way the central government has come up all out to help the state of Jammu Kashmir with human as well as monetary resources in plenty shows the seriously positive attitude of the Modi government towards mitigating the sufferings of Kashmiris.

Indian politics: Wither Aam Aadmi Party?

Indian politics: Wither Aam Aadmi Party?

-Dr. Abdul Ruff Colachal

_____________________

Needless to state that the AAP leaders are the target of a strong conspiracy hatched in New Delhi. Unless Kejriwal wakes up, it would take the toll of the party. Kejriwal won’t be the chief beneficiary.

——-

Many in India and abroad have begun to write off AAP as a party of small petty-minded leaders without any real commitment to the welfare of nations and peole of India. That is not good for India which has pinned all hopes on this new party with new ideology to suit common people of the nation.

Mentality of denial and betrayal is harming the party as well as Delhiites.

No one, especially the Delhiites who voted AAP to power already twice, has any idea about what exactly has been going on after the historic victory in Delhi state assembly polls. Of course, this is not what the people of Delhi and India expected from the leaders of the new party which gave them high hopes.

While collective leadership  is not the  aim of AAP founding leader Kejriwal,  the leaders who now shamelessly wash dirty linen on the Delhi streets  seem to  have failed to  understand that Delhiites voted the AAP  not because of them  and, conversely,  the party  was defeated in parliament poll in Delhi was also not because of them.

Surely, AAP has evolved one man party revolving around Kejriwal leadership and he alone can take credit and blame for the party performance in the poll and governance.

The significant contributions from every leader in AAP, both big and small, cannot, however, be belittled or overlooked by Kejriwal while deciding the party programs and policies, power sharing etc.

It is quite likely that Prashant Bhushan and nurture ambition of ministerial berths in the cabinet and Kejriwal ignored their wishes. No doubt, Bhushan and Yadav deserve more than cabinet positions for their contribution to the party’s growth, for their role in media management to shore up support of some sections of people. Ignoring this fact would amount to denying the due place to leaders they duly deserve.  When they are denied their place in the party and government, they began criticizing Kejriwal and his autocratic style f function.

Officially, the clash of interests between Kejriwal and Bhushan-Yadav was the natural result of ignoring certain principles of AAP that make its stay above all other political outfits, both national and regional.  The complaints by the “detractors” include that Kejriwal encouraged the billionaires to contest the Delhi poll, denying the common leaders to represent the party in the assembly.

Today, Kejriwal is the rule and law of AAP while Bhushan and Yadav seeking some sort of parity with their “colleague” Kejriwal have difficulties in acknowledging that.  Refusal to understand the reality is the fault of Bhushan and Yadav who refused to treat Kejriwal as their only undisputed leader in the party and maybe did not want to obey him for the party’s sake, even if not for the people’s sake.

Kejriwal is angry with them mainly because they indirectly worked against the party interests in Delhi poll as well as after the victory.

This merely is an intellectual problem – a problem that keeps Kejriwal away from known intellectuals Bhushan and Yadav.  That is detrimental to Kejriwal’s future as well as the party’s efficient management.  That would eventually land the party into an era of decadence and people would abandon it as they have done with other major parties.

Peole do not have permanent political allies – they prefer those who work sincerely and without infighting or bickering.

Therefore, removal of those leaders who criticize the leadership on some useful issues is not going to benefit the AAP or Kejriwal in the long run. Delhiites as well as many AAP members across India are disillusioned with AAP functioning.

Needless to state that the AAP leaders are the target of a strong conspiracy hatched in New Delhi. Unless Kejriwal wakes up, it would take the toll of the party. Kejriwal won’t be the chief beneficiary.

For a party like AAP committed to the cause of common people and already set for a national appearance, it is absolutely necessary project a united forum for people to trust the AAP and Kejriwal needs to understand the complexities of party management.  Kejriwal has to ensure unity of AAP.

AAP has no right to destroy the hopes of common people of India.

Indian politics: Wither Aam Aadmi Party?

Indian politics: Wither Aam Aadmi Party?
-Dr. Abdul Ruff Colachal
_____________________

Needless to state that the AAP leaders are the target of a strong conspiracy hatched in New Delhi. Unless Kejriwal wakes up, it would take the toll of the party. Kejriwal won’t be the chief beneficiary.
——-
Many in India and abroad have begun to write off AAP as a party of small petty-minded leaders without any real commitment to the welfare of nations and peole of India. That is not good for India which has pinned all hopes on this new party with new ideology to suit common people of the nation.
Mentality of denial and betrayal is harming the party as well as Delhiites.
No one, especially the Delhiites who voted AAP to power already twice, has any idea about what exactly has been going on after the historic victory in Delhi state assembly polls. Of course, this is not what the people of Delhi and India expected from the leaders of the new party which gave them high hopes.
While collective leadership is not the aim of AAP founding leader Kejriwal, the leaders who now shamelessly wash dirty linen on the Delhi streets seem to have failed to understand that Delhiites voted the AAP not because of them and, conversely, the party was defeated in parliament poll in Delhi was also not because of them.
Surely, AAP has evolved one man party revolving around Kejriwal leadership and he alone can take credit and blame for the party performance in the poll and governance.
The significant contributions from every leader in AAP, both big and small, cannot, however, be belittled or overlooked by Kejriwal while deciding the party programs and policies, power sharing etc.
It is quite likely that Prashant Bhushan and nurture ambition of ministerial berths in the cabinet and Kejriwal ignored their wishes. No doubt, Bhushan and Yadav deserve more than cabinet positions for their contribution to the party’s growth, for their role in media management to shore up support of some sections of people. Ignoring this fact would amount to denying the due place to leaders they duly deserve. When they are denied their place in the party and government, they began criticizing Kejriwal and his autocratic style f function.
Officially, the clash of interests between Kejriwal and Bhushan-Yadav was the natural result of ignoring certain principles of AAP that make its stay above all other political outfits, both national and regional. The complaints by the “detractors” include that Kejriwal encouraged the billionaires to contest the Delhi poll, denying the common leaders to represent the party in the assembly.
Today, Kejriwal is the rule and law of AAP while Bhushan and Yadav seeking some sort of parity with their “colleague” Kejriwal have difficulties in acknowledging that. Refusal to understand the reality is the fault of Bhushan and Yadav who refused to treat Kejriwal as their only undisputed leader in the party and maybe did not want to obey him for the party’s sake, even if not for the people’s sake.
Kejriwal is angry with them mainly because they indirectly worked against the party interests in Delhi poll as well as after the victory.
This merely is an intellectual problem – a problem that keeps Kejriwal away from known intellectuals Bhushan and Yadav. That is detrimental to Kejriwal’s future as well as the party’s efficient management. That would eventually land the party into an era of decadence and people would abandon it as they have done with other major parties.
Peole do not have permanent political allies – they prefer those who work sincerely and without infighting or bickering.
Therefore, removal of those leaders who criticize the leadership on some useful issues is not going to benefit the AAP or Kejriwal in the long run. Delhiites as well as many AAP members across India are disillusioned with AAP functioning.
Needless to state that the AAP leaders are the target of a strong conspiracy hatched in New Delhi. Unless Kejriwal wakes up, it would take the toll of the party. Kejriwal won’t be the chief beneficiary.
For a party like AAP committed to the cause of common people and already set for a national appearance, it is absolutely necessary project a united forum for people to trust the AAP and Kejriwal needs to understand the complexities of party management. Kejriwal has to ensure unity of AAP.
AAP has no right to destroy the hopes of common people of India.

The nuclear deal and Israeli concerns!

The nuclear deal and Israeli concerns!

-Dr. Abdul Ruff Colachal

______

 

 

 

Iran and six world powers tried to break an impasse in nuclear negotiations on March 29, but officials cautioned that attempts to reach a preliminary deal by a deadline in two days could yet fall apart.

The two sides explored compromises in areas including numbers of centrifuges used to enrich uranium that Iran could operate, and its nuclear enrichment work for medical research. Foreign ministers from the six countries will hold the first full meeting with Iran’s foreign minister on 30 March morning. German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier said there had been “some progress and some setbacks in the last hours”. “I can’t rule out that there will be further crises in these negotiations,” he told reporters in Lausanne.

The United States, Britain, France, Germany, Russia and China say they want more than a 10-year suspension of Iran’s most sensitive nuclear work. Tehran, which denies it is trying to develop a nuclear weapons capability- a lie being spread by US-Israeli media Jewish strategists – is demanding an immediate end to international sanctions that are crippling its economy.

A Western diplomat said duration could be traded off if there were real efforts on some key parameters. Officials warned that deep disagreements remained on several points but said the two sides had been closing in on a preliminary deal that could be summarized in a brief document which may or may not be released. Several officials told Reuters that Tehran had indicated a willingness to cut the number of centrifuges it uses to fewer than 6,000, thereby slowing its programme, and to send most of its enriched uranium stockpiles for storage in Russia.

Senior Iranian negotiator Abbas Araqchi told reporters dispatching stockpiles abroad “was not on Iran’s agenda”. Western powers were meanwhile considering allowing Iran to conduct limited and closely monitored enrichment-related work for medical purposes at an underground facility, the officials added on condition of anonymity.

Iran had originally insisted on keeping in operation all the nearly 10,000 centrifuges it currently uses, but said in November that Washington had indicated it could accept around 6,000. Iranian officials say they have been pushing for 6,500-7,000. Baidinejad said cutting the number of Iran’s centrifuges to 6,000 “was one of the proposed ideas by the other party”. All parts of an emerging nuclear deal are interrelated. “Everything could still fall apart” before Tuesday’s self-imposed deadline for a framework agreement, a Western official told Reuters.

Araqchi said he believed a deal was possible but that serious decisions remained to be taken. One concerns Iran’s demand to continue with research into a new generation of advanced centrifuges that can purify uranium faster and in greater quantities for use in nuclear power plants or, if very highly enriched, in weapons.

Another question is over the speed of removing United Nations sanctions on Iran. A senior U.S. official said there were other unresolved questions but expected those would fall into place if the big sticking points could be worked out. The U.S. official said negotiators were working towards something that would be called an “understanding” rather than a formal agreement, which would form the basis of a comprehensive deal, including all technical details, to be tied up by June 30.

Israel, which has in store unaccounted nuke arsenals, claims “threatened” by the possibility of a nuclear-armed Iran, said details of a possible framework agreement emerging from the talks in Lausanne, Switzerland, were even worse than it feared.

A senior European diplomat said ministers were engaged in a “a political push to convince Iran” before Tuesday’s deadline, adding: “All the pieces of a possible accord are there. We have to try and put them in place so that everything adds up.” The powers’ aim is to ensure that for the next decade Iran is kept at least one year away from being able to produce enough fissile nuclear material for a single weapon. “It has to be a deal which puts the bomb beyond Iran’s reach. There can’t be any compromise about that,” British Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond said. “If we’re going to get this done here … Iran has got to take a deep breath and take some tough decisions.”

His remarks contrasted with hostility from Israel, which is believed to have the Middle East’s only nuclear arsenal but is not a party to the talks. “This deal, as it appears to be emerging, bears out all of our fears, and even more than that,” Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu told his cabinet in Jerusalem.

Referring to advances made by Houthi rebels allied to Tehran in Yemen, he accused the Islamic republic of trying to “conquer the entire Middle East”. “The Iran-Lausanne-Yemen axis is very dangerous to humanity, and must be stopped,” Netanyahu said. Israel has previously threatened to attack Iran if it is unhappy with an eventual deal. Ahead of the six powers’ first full ministerial meeting, Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov and U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry had a light-hearted exchange. Asked by reporters if he was optimistic a deal could be reached, Lavrov said: “I’m not paid to be optimistic.” “You’re not paid enough to be optimistic,” responded Kerry.

In order to make the Mideast region tension free, first Israel should be asked to dismantle all its WMD, following which there cold a moratorium on the nuclear weapons in the region.

 

The nuclear deal and Israeli concerns!

The nuclear deal and Israeli concerns!

-Dr. Abdul Ruff Colachal

______

Iran and six world powers tried to break an impasse in nuclear negotiations on March 29, but officials cautioned that attempts to reach a preliminary deal by a deadline in two days could yet fall apart.

The two sides explored compromises in areas including numbers of centrifuges used to enrich uranium that Iran could operate, and its nuclear enrichment work for medical research. Foreign ministers from the six countries will hold the first full meeting with Iran’s foreign minister on 30 March morning. German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier said there had been “some progress and some setbacks in the last hours”. “I can’t rule out that there will be further crises in these negotiations,” he told reporters in Lausanne.

The United States, Britain, France, Germany, Russia and China say they want more than a 10-year suspension of Iran’s most sensitive nuclear work. Tehran, which denies it is trying to develop a nuclear weapons capability- a lie being spread by US-Israeli media Jewish strategists – is demanding an immediate end to international sanctions that are crippling its economy.

A Western diplomat said duration could be traded off if there were real efforts on some key parameters. Officials warned that deep disagreements remained on several points but said the two sides had been closing in on a preliminary deal that could be summarized in a brief document which may or may not be released. Several officials told Reuters that Tehran had indicated a willingness to cut the number of centrifuges it uses to fewer than 6,000, thereby slowing its programme, and to send most of its enriched uranium stockpiles for storage in Russia.

Senior Iranian negotiator Abbas Araqchi told reporters dispatching stockpiles abroad “was not on Iran’s agenda”. Western powers were meanwhile considering allowing Iran to conduct limited and closely monitored enrichment-related work for medical purposes at an underground facility, the officials added on condition of anonymity.

Iran had originally insisted on keeping in operation all the nearly 10,000 centrifuges it currently uses, but said in November that Washington had indicated it could accept around 6,000. Iranian officials say they have been pushing for 6,500-7,000. Baidinejad said cutting the number of Iran’s centrifuges to 6,000 “was one of the proposed ideas by the other party”. All parts of an emerging nuclear deal are interrelated. “Everything could still fall apart” before Tuesday’s self-imposed deadline for a framework agreement, a Western official told Reuters.

Araqchi said he believed a deal was possible but that serious decisions remained to be taken. One concerns Iran’s demand to continue with research into a new generation of advanced centrifuges that can purify uranium faster and in greater quantities for use in nuclear power plants or, if very highly enriched, in weapons.

Another question is over the speed of removing United Nations sanctions on Iran. A senior U.S. official said there were other unresolved questions but expected those would fall into place if the big sticking points could be worked out. The U.S. official said negotiators were working towards something that would be called an “understanding” rather than a formal agreement, which would form the basis of a comprehensive deal, including all technical details, to be tied up by June 30.

Israel, which has in store unaccounted nuke arsenals, claims “threatened” by the possibility of a nuclear-armed Iran, said details of a possible framework agreement emerging from the talks in Lausanne, Switzerland, were even worse than it feared.

A senior European diplomat said ministers were engaged in a “a political push to convince Iran” before Tuesday’s deadline, adding: “All the pieces of a possible accord are there. We have to try and put them in place so that everything adds up.” The powers’ aim is to ensure that for the next decade Iran is kept at least one year away from being able to produce enough fissile nuclear material for a single weapon. “It has to be a deal which puts the bomb beyond Iran’s reach. There can’t be any compromise about that,” British Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond said. “If we’re going to get this done here … Iran has got to take a deep breath and take some tough decisions.”

His remarks contrasted with hostility from Israel, which is believed to have the Middle East’s only nuclear arsenal but is not a party to the talks. “This deal, as it appears to be emerging, bears out all of our fears, and even more than that,” Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu told his cabinet in Jerusalem.

Referring to advances made by Houthi rebels allied to Tehran in Yemen, he accused the Islamic republic of trying to “conquer the entire Middle East”. “The Iran-Lausanne-Yemen axis is very dangerous to humanity, and must be stopped,” Netanyahu said. Israel has previously threatened to attack Iran if it is unhappy with an eventual deal. Ahead of the six powers’ first full ministerial meeting, Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov and U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry had a light-hearted exchange. Asked by reporters if he was optimistic a deal could be reached, Lavrov said: “I’m not paid to be optimistic.” “You’re not paid enough to be optimistic,” responded Kerry.

In order to make the Mideast region tension free, first Israel should be asked to dismantle all its WMD, following which there cold a moratorium on the nuclear weapons in the region.

The nuclear deal and Israeli concerns!

The nuclear deal and Israeli concerns!

-Dr. Abdul Ruff Colachal

______

Iran and six world powers tried to break an impasse in nuclear negotiations on March 29, but officials cautioned that attempts to reach a preliminary deal by a deadline in two days could yet fall apart.

The two sides explored compromises in areas including numbers of centrifuges used to enrich uranium that Iran could operate, and its nuclear enrichment work for medical research. Foreign ministers from the six countries will hold the first full meeting with Iran’s foreign minister on 30 March morning. German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier said there had been “some progress and some setbacks in the last hours”. “I can’t rule out that there will be further crises in these negotiations,” he told reporters in Lausanne.

The United States, Britain, France, Germany, Russia and China say they want more than a 10-year suspension of Iran’s most sensitive nuclear work. Tehran, which denies it is trying to develop a nuclear weapons capability- a lie being spread by US-Israeli media Jewish strategists – is demanding an immediate end to international sanctions that are crippling its economy.

A Western diplomat said duration could be traded off if there were real efforts on some key parameters. Officials warned that deep disagreements remained on several points but said the two sides had been closing in on a preliminary deal that could be summarized in a brief document which may or may not be released. Several officials told Reuters that Tehran had indicated a willingness to cut the number of centrifuges it uses to fewer than 6,000, thereby slowing its programme, and to send most of its enriched uranium stockpiles for storage in Russia.

Senior Iranian negotiator Abbas Araqchi told reporters dispatching stockpiles abroad “was not on Iran’s agenda”. Western powers were meanwhile considering allowing Iran to conduct limited and closely monitored enrichment-related work for medical purposes at an underground facility, the officials added on condition of anonymity.

Iran had originally insisted on keeping in operation all the nearly 10,000 centrifuges it currently uses, but said in November that Washington had indicated it could accept around 6,000. Iranian officials say they have been pushing for 6,500-7,000. Baidinejad said cutting the number of Iran’s centrifuges to 6,000 “was one of the proposed ideas by the other party”. All parts of an emerging nuclear deal are interrelated. “Everything could still fall apart” before Tuesday’s self-imposed deadline for a framework agreement, a Western official told Reuters.

Araqchi said he believed a deal was possible but that serious decisions remained to be taken. One concerns Iran’s demand to continue with research into a new generation of advanced centrifuges that can purify uranium faster and in greater quantities for use in nuclear power plants or, if very highly enriched, in weapons.

Another question is over the speed of removing United Nations sanctions on Iran. A senior U.S. official said there were other unresolved questions but expected those would fall into place if the big sticking points could be worked out. The U.S. official said negotiators were working towards something that would be called an “understanding” rather than a formal agreement, which would form the basis of a comprehensive deal, including all technical details, to be tied up by June 30.

Israel, which has in store unaccounted nuke arsenals, claims “threatened” by the possibility of a nuclear-armed Iran, said details of a possible framework agreement emerging from the talks in Lausanne, Switzerland, were even worse than it feared.

A senior European diplomat said ministers were engaged in a “a political push to convince Iran” before Tuesday’s deadline, adding: “All the pieces of a possible accord are there. We have to try and put them in place so that everything adds up.” The powers’ aim is to ensure that for the next decade Iran is kept at least one year away from being able to produce enough fissile nuclear material for a single weapon. “It has to be a deal which puts the bomb beyond Iran’s reach. There can’t be any compromise about that,” British Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond said. “If we’re going to get this done here … Iran has got to take a deep breath and take some tough decisions.”

His remarks contrasted with hostility from Israel, which is believed to have the Middle East’s only nuclear arsenal but is not a party to the talks. “This deal, as it appears to be emerging, bears out all of our fears, and even more than that,” Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu told his cabinet in Jerusalem.

Referring to advances made by Houthi rebels allied to Tehran in Yemen, he accused the Islamic republic of trying to “conquer the entire Middle East”. “The Iran-Lausanne-Yemen axis is very dangerous to humanity, and must be stopped,” Netanyahu said. Israel has previously threatened to attack Iran if it is unhappy with an eventual deal. Ahead of the six powers’ first full ministerial meeting, Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov and U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry had a light-hearted exchange. Asked by reporters if he was optimistic a deal could be reached, Lavrov said: “I’m not paid to be optimistic.” “You’re not paid enough to be optimistic,” responded Kerry.

In order to make the Mideast region tension free, first Israel should be asked to dismantle all its WMD, following which there cold a moratorium on the nuclear weapons in the region.

Fresh floods in Kashmir damage homes, snap road connectivity!

Fresh floods in Kashmir damage homes, snap road connectivity!

-Abdul Ruff Colachal

________________

Kashmir, gifted with nature’s bounty, is also the zone badly affected by natural calamities. Kashmiris continue to suffer even otherwise!

Latest flash floods triggered by incessant rain have damaged scores of houses, school buildings and other structures besides snapping road connectivity in the Kashmir Valley, an official said on March 29 Sunday. Over 80 structures, including residential homes, school buildings and other structures, have suffered damage due to flash floods since Saturday in Srinagar.

The Srinagar-Jammu National Highway was closed following landslides at a number of places on Sunday. The Srinagar-Gulmarg road was also closed after a bridge in Kunzar village was washed away by the swollen Ferozepur Nallah.

There was water-logging in many commercial and residential areas in Srinagar.

However, the water level in the Jhelum River was below the danger mark, both at Sangam in Anantnag district and at Ram Munshibagh in Srinagar.

Chief Minister Mufti Muhammad Sayeed took stock of the flood threat and reviewed the preparedness of the administration that has already been put on high alert. The University of Kashmir has postponed all examinations scheduled for Monday and Tuesday.

The local meteorological department has forecast moderate rain in Jammu and Kashmir on Monday and decrease in precipitation thereafter. Late at night, state government finally conceded and has announced flood warning, although earlier Met department had said chances are little, cautioning against panic

Sonam Lotus, director of the meteorological office, had on Sunday dismissed any flood threat to the Kashmir Valley. Lotus told IANS on Sunday: “Although there has been a rise in the water level of rivers and streams in the Kashmi Valley due to overnight incessant rains, there is no reason to worry. Every downpour and precipitation does not bring a flood. There is little likelihood of any flood in the valley because of the current western disturbance. There will be a decrease in precipitation tomorrow onwards.

Another western disturbance is likely to hit the state on April 2 but that is going to be weaker than the present one. “Therefore, I do not think we are facing a flood threat this time although mountain streams need to be watched for any sudden rise that can cause local damage and trigger landslides.” Lotus, however, advised people to exercise caution on the Srinagar-Jammu highway which he said could get blocked due to landslides in Ramban district.

In wake of heavy rainfall in Kashmir valley, the Jammu and Kashmir state government on Sunday deputed four ministers to monitor rising water levels in Kashmir valley. Even Chief Minister Mufti Mohammad Sayeed is on his way to Srinagar to personally monitor the arising situation.

Heavy rains have lashed the Kashmir valley since last evening leading to sudden surge in water level of rivers, streams and rivulets, causing panic among the residents about possibility of fresh floods even as the MeT department warned of week Long wet weather in the state. Hundreds of families putting up in houses near the banks of river Jhelum from Nayina to Lethpora area have started shifting to safer locations in view of increase in water level in the river, reports said Sunday. Fearing that the river might swell again as it did during devastating floods in September last year, panicky residents have started relocating.

A special control room has been established at Police headquarter Srinagar to monitor the situation. The helpline numbers of the control room are 2452138, 2474040.
Hopefully the central government would rush all needy help to Kashmir without delay so that people and their properties can be saved.

Dismissal of Qureshi as Mizoram governor: Indian Governors should display dignity, high moral standards!

Dismissal of Qureshi as Mizoram governor: Indian Governors should display dignity, high moral standards!

-Dr. Abdul Ruff Colachal

Like the president of India, the governors of states are appointed by the incumbent government for a specific period as per the Indian Constitution.  These high dignitaries stay in power so long as the government at the centre is satisfied with their performance, among other matters, particularly political views.

When a government falls and a new government assumes power at the centre the terms of president of India and governors of states do not automatically co-terminate with that government that appointed them but decency and political relevance demand they tender their resignations or express their willingness to quit at least and if the new dispensation is pleased with them there is no problem and they can continue to enjoy their positions.

Unfortunately, governors do not want to quit the offices as they do not care for maintaining their gubernatorial dignity by leaving the office when the incumbent government falls and replaced by a new one.  They should know they became governors  only because the previous government  preferred them against many others keeping in view  the party line politics

The governors, who were appointed by the Congress  led UPA government should have vacated the posts in a civilized manner as soon as their  party which ruled I India was dethroned  by the peole of India.

The cultural level of governors goes too low when they, in order to enjoy the governor’s palace life, approach the courts against the new government’ requests to quit .

When BJP came to power it sought to replace all Governors who are Congress party embers but not every governor was pleased to oblige the central government.  The Narendra Modi government transferred some of them to other states to get the posts vacated to accommodate its favored persons – as the Congress government also has done before.

After the new Government took over, many governors appointed by the previous UPA regime were eased out which included Beniwal, 87, who had served in Gujarat earlier and had a running battle with Modi when he was the state’s chief minister. Virendra Kataria, a former Congress leader, was also sacked as Puducherry lieutenant governor.

Maharashtra Governor K Sankaranarayanan, who was also transferred to Mizoram, had tendered his resignation, refusing to take charge of his new assignment. Kerala governor and former CM of Delhi state Sheila Dikshit refused to leave governorship (just after a few months of her appointment by the then Congress government) but the centre now ruled by BJP’s  PM Narendra Modi acted swiftly to remove her in a diplomatic manner. Four other governors — MK Narayanan (West Bengal), Ashwani Kumar (Nagaland), BL Joshi (UP), Shekhar Dutt (Chhattisgarh) and B V Wanchoo (Goa) had put in their papers apparently after they were telephoned by the Union Home secretary.

Mizoram Governor Aziz Qureshi is one of those who stubbornly declined to quit.   Qureshi, who has had a running feud with the Centre and even approached the Supreme Court against attempts to ease him out, was sacked on March 28. A brief statement issued by the Rashtrapati Bhavan said that “Qureshi shall cease to hold the office of the Governor of Mizoram.” Governor of West Bengal Keshari Nath Tripathi has been asked to discharge the functions of the Mizoram Governor, in addition to his own duties, until regular arrangements are made, it said.

Qureshi, who had a tenure till May 2017, is the second Governor after Kamla Beniwal to be sacked after having been shifted to Mizoram months after the Narendra Modi government assumed office.

Qureshi, who was among the Governors appointed by the UPA government and was told by the then Home Secretary Anil Goswami to quit after change in Government, approached the Supreme Court against attempts to ease him out. He was then the Uttarakhand Governor.  In his petition, Qureshi, a veteran Congress leader, had claimed that after the NDA government came to power, Goswami had called him on 30 July and asked him to tender resignation and made it clear that he will be removed from office if he does not step down. He alleged, in his petition, that Goswami again called him on August 8 insisting that he resign.

Goswami had said in his reply to the Supreme Court that he had, with authority and justification, “suggested” to Qureshi that he should consider resigning on his own since his actions were not “behoving the status of the Governor” and showed the constitutional office in “very poor light” apart from “bringing it into disrespect”.

By refusing to  tender his resignation even when the new government in power asked repeatedly,  Qureshi has committed not just a big  blunder but also impropriety as he failed to uphold the dignity that comes with Governor’s post.

Governors need to be model citizens with high moral standards and should behave while in office and respect the central government and people of the state and India at large.  They should not create scenes  to stay in power against the will of the central government and precipitate the matter to such an extent  the central government sack them which is  a dishonor to the position of  state governors.

If the governors keep politics out of their offices, many problems do not arise all at all. However, most governors convert their offices into party central offices.  In fact it is the national Congress party that is responsible of polarization of governors’ offices in India.

Dismissal of governor Qureshi should serve as an important lesson for all Indian governors.

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